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care reform, one of the authors of this bill, mr. waxman, the ranking member of energy and commerce, from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: i thank the gentleman for yielding to me. the truth of the matter is no matter how many votes the republicans cast to repeal the affordable care act, and no matter how many distortions they spread about the law, there are some facts they cannot change. they cannot change the fact that because the affordable care act nobody in america can ever again be denied health insurance because they have a pre-existing condition. they cannot change the fact that a woman can never be charged more than a man for the same coverage. they cannot change the fact that a family will never again be left without coverage just because their child's hospital bills got too high. these facts are stubborn. they are inconvenient for my republican colleagues, so they ignore them and they deny them. republicans have voted or will today 50 times to try to take away the basic security and freedom guaranteed by the aff
as a lost ideal? >> we're going to be looking at energy security in the next half hour of "gmt" as the white house says a billion dollars in energy aid is coming to ukraine's way. john kerry has just arrived in kiev as well. so that was our first task, was getting him to wellness. without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. from contractors and doctors to dog sitters and landscapers, you can find it all on angie's list. we found riley at the shelter, and found everything he needed at angie's list. join today at angieslist.com [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay. you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car, and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. learn about it at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? introducing starbucks via latte. instant coffee lovers now have something new to love. still running in t
nuclear energy programs they've announced the details of a plan that designates atomic energy as an important source of power by nhk world you reach a cocktail of points. no the danger we will figure out how much nuclear power we need to win and we will secure that the mount wilson the draft document adopted by a group of cabinet ministers and gorse is a major change in japan's energy policy the nuclear accident in issue three years ago triggered a nationwide debate over nuclear power the ruling party of the five promises to phase out nuclear energy whizzing through the years. to go on his return to palm a good december two thousand fall collection change the situation. the prime minister called the elimination of nuclear power would be responsible the trough and the policy adopted on tuesday he says the government will restart reactors but was weakly it the latest safety regulations the document also underlines the need to learn from the nuclear accident. and he pulled themselves safe but some people question whether it is really safe to resume operations. nuclear complex amo
up energy production all over the countr country, fracking, you tell me, these five things, i would think the alternative party in the country could agree with? >> well, sean, to quote jerry mcguire, you had me at hello. >> i'm trying to get an answer. >> i completely agree. yes, yes, yes and yes. you're exactly right. but look, that is presenting a positive pro-growth vision. there is a better way. we can bring back economic growth and get people back to work but not continuing down the road of the obama economic policy which is hurting millions of american's all over this country. >> are you seriously considering, a lot of people banter your name out there, are you considering a run for the 2016 presidency? >> well, i appreciate the question. right now i'm trying to win the senate. i think republicans can take control of the senate in 2014. my view as a senator, as a voter, the person who i intend to vote for is whoever is standing up and leading, whoever is effectively leading. i hope everyone stepping up. i hope we have an abundance of riches. that would be a terrific outcome fo
the stakes in both energy prices and other risks. we might see energy prices go up. a good chunk of europe's gas supply come from russia. and if that is at risk, they could be cut off. >> when we talk about emerging markets many include russia in places where you can invest and get a very high return. in in the risk of that country suffers, they may pull back from the united states. we're talking about crimea who are holding a referendum for greater autonomy. it's a greater impact. i don't think the impact will be that great. >> there is the ethical, moral issues involved whether or not they should help the ukraine. but as far as the economic connection, you think its simpler? >> i think if the intention the tensions flare-up between russia and u.s. and they're start to go, and they're pushed into a corner by the u.s. and aid by the european union, there could be an impact on the global energy crisis. >> let me ask you a question. we mentioned last month china with that bad economic report and then run on currency, people moved their money and it caused the stock market to dive. why not on
. his funds blew away the market last year. you done want to miss hpicks. >>> the energy departmentç approving loan guarantees for first new nuclear power plant in years. christine todd whitman tells us whether this is the beginning of a nuclear resurgence in this country. >> and chipotle trying to walk back comments that rising costs associated with climate change could eventually force the company to take guacamole or salsa off the menu. we have a stock brawl coming up. you're watching cnbc, first in business worldwide. for tapping into a wealth of experience. ♪ for access to one of the top wealth management firms in the country. ♪ for a team of financial professionals who provide customized solutions. for all of your wealth management and retirement goals, discover how pnc wealth management can help you achieve. visit pnc.com/wealthsolutions to find out more. make it happen with fidelity active trader pro. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. call or click to open your fidelity account today. >>> welcome back. the recent spike in energy p
energy costs down whether it be in refining where he has the best chemicals to be able to get the most gasoline out of dirty oil, for instance, in the turbo which is what you need to be able to low your -- get more mileage out of each gallon. that's a very important thing. and, of course, he does the cockpits for pretty much everybody. he's done a remarkable job in honeywell, my charitable trust owns it. it's just been a gigantic winner. at one point they asked him about activism and he had a great answer when your stock goes up all the time the activists don't call. good man. >> is it your favorite industrial name? >> definitely. >> really? >> yeah dave cody is a remarkable guy, and yes, i'll admit we are next-door neighbors and he's also a terrific guy in person. >> you can't argue with what he brings to the interview and certainly with the stock as you said. we'll watch that closely along with exxon also having a -- >> yes, down. >>> in the meantime, former microsoft ceo steve ballmer giving a talk to graduate students at the university of oxford's school o
november tends to have less than its course without cctv. part of its commitment to grow its clean energy economy new york city has on bio dome and a roof top solar installation incorporating new technology if successful with ceci says the site will be of good friends of the politics of correspondence korea cuba as the story. this rooftop in the bronx. not only has a stellar view of manhattan but is now home to the city's largest solar installation. it has more than forty seven hundred solar panels which will generate in excess of one point eight million kilowatt hours of clean energy pre year it'll end up running over thirty percent of our time electric usage for the building of the post peter clare otc senior vice president jan term cash and carry a large steel food service supplier and invested in the project. he says energy costs at this two hundred thousand square foot location. among the biggest expenses. this facility with all the refrigeration and freezer that we had to take substantial the environmental protection agency says the installation will likely offset more than twelve h
regulation authority chairman welcomed the staff from the japan nuclear energy safety organization. he said there are great expectations for the new members as they have high skill levels and expertise. >> translator: i would like you to do your best, so our organization can gain the trust of the people as a regulatory body. >> the merger was planned in the wake of the 2011 nuclear accident in fukushima. nuclear regulators at the time were criticized for lacking expertise. the addition almost doubles the staff of the nra's secretariat. many of the newly joined engineers are retirees of nuclear plantmakers. the regulators are now examining safety measures at nuclear power plants across japan. a safety screening is a prerequisite for resuming nuclear power generation. all reactors in the country are currently offline. >>> japan's education ministry officials have revised teaching materials they made after the nuclear accident in fukushima. they want students to learn more about the impact of the disaster, in addition to getting basic knowledge of radiation. the ministry originally published b
stock for 10-plus years, other than the energy sector, and that is where we thought the lifting of all of that public policy and certainty related to all of the government issues we have had the last two years, that would be the main driver and that durable a much more placed to pick consumer oriented companies. indexdid see the pricing today -- it went up a point more than people thought, giving some hope it would rebound a little bit. but guess what? the r&d taxon of credits last year. congress did not renew those. we are seeing bid increases -- big increases in november and december. we have seen nothing in february so far. what we do not know is whether we will see that building and, whether there was a temporal, prime shift with black -- prime shift -- >> you think that is inevitable? >> the good part of the durable goods report last month, or last week showed a big pickup in january. we had in industrials conference. we got a lot of positive .necdotes from these companies they are much more interested in capital spending or even nurtures and acquisitions than vying back stocks. i
. we know the structurally the energy market is changing. the loss isn't there. what is more important is the on tohat rwe is holding the guidance and they gave. , the current net income. they said we will make one point $3 billion. that is incredibly important if you are a dividend or stockholder in this company. kitchen seek is a colloquial term for dumping everything that is bad. if the with gusto. it is making savings. and howfunction exciting my life he gets on tuesday. renewables is a part of the business. it is barely 1%. record.ibility is at a that is according to bloomberg industry. that has a significant tale. new business is making record profits and expenditure is also at a five-year low. mothballing old plans. getting ready for 2022. why do i say that? germany comes off line. >> i was going to ask you about that. is a story about the german energy market changing completely. >> if you think about the edict -- green power wants to constitute 45% of energy production. up from under 25%. with energy.ution energy prices have been coming off a month after month. down by 15%. th
since thanksgiving. is that because the street now sees tesla as an energy company, not just an electric car company? we have one guest who's going to make that case coming up. >> that story, bill, tesla, has been the story all week. now, here's how we stand in markets. what were you going to stay? >> i was going to say an analyst price forecast for that stock are all over the map. from the $200 range to the $60 range. >> pun intended. any who, here's where the dow stands. up to 16,245. meanwhile, as we mentioned off the top, the s&p 500 up about six points to just about 1851 at this hour. that's three points above its all-time closing high. >> all right, everybody. belly up. let's talk about this marketing in today's "closing bell" exchange. we have a lot of people, more who will be joining us. heather hughes just sitting down. how are you? >> good. >> greg ip from the economist. we have john doyle, jim lowell from adviser investments. we have steve liesman, rick santelli. it's a cast of thousands here. steve, i'm going to start with you. give us the hits and runs of janet yellen's test
carrying out algorithms. energy transportation, and our banking system and computers are every where how do we jump to dangerous? because of this man. he is the ted maker for understanding artificial super intelligence and i have two chapters of the final intervention. he uses the theory of economics. get that humans or machines has preferences of utility functions. to make a predictable when the economist proposed is this that we're not rational all the time you're impulse buyers. but we can probably anticipate that smart machines would be logical of that economic sense. to have a basic drive with self protection and efficiency and increase. self improving machines whether that goal is to play chess and to succeed they will need resources or whatever is most expedient. they will also seek to avoid failure like being turned off or unplug. they will protect themselves they will be efficient and squander resources. for creative ways to achieve their goals. since it is one witting route here is the rub. with the risk of a i behavior sue for intelligence is not imply benevolence super intellige
. to the extent we could impose energy sanctions on russia, understandable and effect because they rely so much but i would go one more step and say by 2020 we are expected to be the world's leading producer of energy and there's talk about exporting natural gas, we need to make it clear we need to start planning for the long game and we will have natural gas with allies that reliance on russian gas to be accountable. stuart: it is all about energy, isn't it? a lot of europe is supplied with natural gas, a lot of that comes through ukraine and from russia. therefore, there is a limit to a and forbid its natural gas to get into europe. the europeans will never look at that. stuart: we have to take into account the effect this will have on their economy, doing things that will affect their allies may not be beneficial but if the president came out today, he won't but if he came out today and said we are an energy powerhouse we are committing that in ten years we have great contract with our allies that would scare the russians. vladimir putin does things with long hall and he knows is only play i
. we see an energy prices up. so we see an uptick for brent. point when these oil prices continue to uptick. it will get to a point where people will start thinking about inflation. perhaps what it could mean for growth ahead. for gold, one point three percent, we are now at $1343. a $150 gain so far. north korea, when that happens, we usually get an uptick along the south korean defense plays. naver corp, two percent down after gains last week. i will be back later on. john, back to you. j.crewican fashion has -- has friends in very hype very high places. and may have a new owner. >> that is the country trading in the japanese trading session. they may acquire j.crew for a deal valued at the $5 billion. really looking to make inroads in the u.s. unwilling to grow and expand overseas. they want to be the world's largest clothing retailer. so they are betting on scoop-neck tees and cardigans. the bigs fan is michelle obama the united states. she loves them. i love -- i wear some j.crew j.crew -- i wear some clothing. it is hard to buy it here. leonard green has been the guy behind
television service. number three is fuel energy. fuel cell, which reports earnings on march 10, is one of the most overbought stocks. >> i am talking cars. the auto-parts retailer reporting in nine percent increase as well as sales growth of four percent. severe winter weather actually helps sales by accelerating demand area >> number one is radioshack. shares plunged more than 25% after the electronics chain announced plans to close up to 1100 stores in the u.s., or 20% of its footprint. radioshack also reported a significantly wider loss for the fourth quarter. are also keeping our eyes on shares of smith and west. the gunmaker reporting earnings after the close today. a bumpy ride for alix steel, and paul barrett joins us from washington. on god's.t with you we saw them take off in 2013 under the threat of more regulation. what is happening, why this decline now? >> there has not been any kind of tragedies. if you take a look at federal background check which analysts say can be a relatively good barometer for sales, they tend to increase we see some kind of national shooting. auror
are under way. they can develop alternative energy supplies, including fracking. including as the united states becomes an energy exporter, there are alternative sources there in the future and sources -- the inauguration of of the new pipeline project from the caspian sea which will be a new route for gas supplies into europe, not passing through russia, not from russia. this infrastructure will take time to develop but it is important to do so. the world is becoming increasingly unstable. this latest example to world peace is the classic case in my view. will the foreign secretary array with me -- agree with me that our country must rethink the funding of our armed forces to make sure we have the ships, the navy, the air force to me potential threats in the future. i am not hinting we should go to war on this case but it is a reminder we need to keep our defenses up. in an unstable world we do need to keep up our defenses, that is right. that is why this country is investing in some very sophisticated military projects for the future. as twotain the spending percent of our gdp on defen
the world. >>ali, shock wave to the energy prices? >> yes, oil prices, that is global, that rose 2%, $105s a barrel now and we are going to feel that at the pumps and the price natural gas in germany and uk jumped 10%. germany is an industrial power house and depends on natural gas for electricity and call coming from russia, 40% of the the natural gas coming from russia through the ukraine and that is not good news. this is not affecting u.s. natural gas. we don't want to see russia pushing europe back into a recession because we all know that hitting us all. >> what other aspects are you looking at? >> i am looking at a guy that bidding plumbing and manufacturing parts and he exports them and invests in a factory operation in crimea, and he's doing this for a while and i am going to talk to him about affecting his business so we are connected. >> thank you, ali and thank you. we have a response to the ukrainian crisis on social media. >> ukrainians are going online and expressing their feelings on what is happening in their crime. a woman is saying she wants peace, not war and take a loo
of conserving energy and reducing emissions remains arduous. >> reporter: and he promised the government will severely punish public servants and others involved in corruption. after the session we asked some delegates about li's report. >> translator: i think the campaign against corruption should be more tightened up. it's also set out in report. only in doing so the government could do its own duty. >> this i think is a basement, there will be some problem. so we need to do things step by step. >> let's now talk more about the government work report. nhk world kyoko fujita spent the day going through it. let's start by talking about the 7.5% economic growth target. what's behind the decision to maintain that figure? >> well, this is very much what china's economy from one that's export led to one that relies more on domestic consumptiocons. here's more of what premier li had to say. >> translator: we set the growth target at around 7.5%, because we considered that was necessary. and feasible. >> since coming into power last year, president xi and premier li have been focusing on quali
european cell wondering whether the current crisis will suck because of the home when it comes to energy. cctv jackpot and filed this report from brussels. ukraine continues to brace itself for shopping places in the price of russian gas or even gasp cops europe is also in calculating how badly the current crisis could hit its own energy supply. it's pure been told who consumes about four hundred fifty billion cubic meters of casper year. and some two thirds of these are imported from third countries. tom and one third of toast with guards are from russia. that adds up to about a quarter of europe's gas coming from russia. how stations back in the lights on. pastor warms up comes in a bull dog central heating. strong yes about how the eu russian gas supplies wrong for you cry in two thousand and nine when the kremlin cup gets during a rally with kiev because has a list in your that was during a very harsh winds of winter just passed laws that take you a mile of the sort of fit in well so we're going out clothes someone so when all talking about an immediate crisis swan contingency plans
forward an energy plan that shows how we can move out of this. i fault them as well. no government has been willing to stand up to these powerful interests. and that's why people are confus confused. many people, most people in america know climate is changing, most of those who say that know that it's human caused. i think that most of the debate is about the science is a pseudodebate. what we don't have is a real debate about how to change the energy system right now. >> but let me ask you on that, note, bill. because the president, i mean, first of all, it's not just america. we need an international quorum for action. >> that's correct. >> 7 of the 200-plus countries account for -- china is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases. india is right up there. they have not been particularly forward leaning on this issue in terms of gathering international action on it. so what -- internationally what should be done to increase, i think, the sort of buy-in, if you will from other countries and then i want to ask you as a follow-up after you answer that, how do you grade the president's
in europe and it has really shrunk. potentially, they have big energy plans for europe. >> it is not proven yet. >> if it turns out that american companies are there -- >> let me ask about the united states. >> yeah. crimea, the have gas and -- but let me ask you about the united states role. you had friendly relations with george bush and you had good relations with the obama administration. i expect that you feel that the administration was not as helpful to georgia as they could have been and will not be as helpful in the ukraine because the united states has bigger fish to fry with russia. i do not think anybody can afford to neglect this. if they do, it is a major disaster. this guy is dangerous. this is going to continue. it is not limited to crimea. it allows us to have another crisis moving somewhere and everybody forgets what happened in georgia apostates. it is getting shorter and -- ter and >> to be fair, he said that he did not feel any need to escalate. >> they are using the word of escalation stop there with the occupation and europeans might escalating.is he is escalating. le
about sempra energy? you know i like these good conservative companies. shocker? i don't think so. seventh, ebay! what can i say? we have been red hot on this country ever since carl eicahn got involved. when we've seen the corporate breakups in the past, they've made us a ton of money. whitewave broke off of dean foods. a national food company is going to be able to be on a stand-alone basis more effective than a combined company that has just gotten milk and focused natural foods. i think acahn is right. ebay should split up, too. we know value and breakups work. this is the gift that keeps on giving. thank you carl icahn. and verizon. now that the deal allowing verizon to buy the rest of verizon wireless closed, all the brokers are piling in, praising it and both jpmorgan and morgan stanley today. i know expressed frustration because i like the deal so much. just when you start to get maximum frustration is when things get real interesting. verizon could be a core holding for any portfolio. it remains the stock i shout back at people when they shout back at me, jim, booyah, wha
issues. this is the energy department's largest clean up anywhere in the united states. trying to take those 56 million-gallons of radioactive sludge that were in underground tanks. they are trying to turn that into solid glass. it is a massive project. how does this work? >> well the 17 self-tanks are distributed over quite a few square miles with an intricate net of pumps and pipes. when it is pumped to facility that i was previously supporting, we would then treat that waste chemically to get some of the more dangerous constituents out of it and then after we had treated it chemically we would put it into a melter with glass heat it up to high temperatures. >> the tanks that were underground were beginning to leak. they were old and the danger was some of them were fairly close to the colombia river and there is fear that somehow some of that radioactive material could get into the river. >> it is a fear based on reality. the single shell tanks which were actually decommissioned in the 40s and 50s, those tanks are known to have been leaking into the environment for years. we have co
broadening the energy base for the navy. how is that going? and how do you manage that? >> first it is going very well. to answer the first question it is fuel and energy is a military vulnerability particularly the way we are doing it today. i'm very glad that america is producing more oil and gas. but even if we produce all that we can use, there are two overriding factors. number one oil and gas are global commodities and the price is set globally. so, you get some instability somewhere, you get somebody threatening to close a strait somewhere, you get anything, when the price of oil went up $10 with syria syria is not a major producer but it sis the security premium that traders place on oil regardless of where it is coming from. every time the price of oil goes up a dollar a barrel it costs the navy and manner corps an additional $30 million. in 2011 and 2012 the navy was presented with an additional unbudgeted $2 billion in fall costs. well there are not many places to go get that sort of money. you can take it out fof operations. so you steam less, fly less, or if
. why? because rush ha is blackmailing europe over energy. supplies a third of oil and natural gas to the eu. the more oil and natural gas the u.s.a. and canada can produce and distribute, the weaker russia becomes on the world stage i fervently hope president obama understands that finally, there is barack obama's legacy. hear's a satirical picture posted on fox nation showing the contrasting styles of putin and obama. obviously the russian leader sees himself as macho man. the president sees himself as a renaissance man who wants to accommodate. but there is no accommodating putin. and if the u.s.a. looks weak on this one, believe me, we'll pay a heavy price. as will the president's historical reputation. and that's the memo. now for the top story tonight reaction joining us from boston fox news military analyst colonel david hunt and -- am i making mistakes here, mr. whiten? >> no, i don't think so. i would add a few other things to the list. you know, we can be specific with building -- helping central europe get free of russian energy. it's russian energy that's been used agai
, the reality is that russia has a lot of nuclear weapons. their economy is modest except for energy, and they're not a great power, but they have the ability to pick them off one at a time. their neighbors abroad, they can do that, they went into georgia as you'll recall. ukraine is enormously important to the world. and the idea that we would have created an environment that is hospitable is outrageous. it's not just putin, it's going to be the people's republic of china. even if it's not in cahoots with put putin. >> it seems like the president and the secretary of state keep lecturing putin, that they have a 19th century mentality, this is the 21st century. he made a speech where -- in which he says the great power conflict is a thing of the past. i want to ask you about these words the president uttered many listen to this closely. >> those countries that are large like russia or china, we have the kind of relationship with them we're not getting into conflicts of that sort at least over the last several decades, there's been a recognition that neither country benefits from that kind of g
of their energy supplies and actually we have seen a significant recession in european leadership over the last ten to 20 years. but we need to act and we need to speak up in favor of the people who are now being overtaken in crimea by vladimir putin's army, his military. and i worry and -- in conclusion i say it's time we woke up about vladimir putin. it's time that this administration got real. and it's also time for us to worry about what vladimir putin will do on eastern ukraine on the pretext that somehow disorder and demonstrations might require russian presence. and my friends, if we allow mr. putin to assert his authority over these areas because of russian-speaking people, that message is not lost on poland, where there's russian population, on romania, on latvia, estonia, lithuania and moldova, and we are on the verge possibly of seeing a move to reassert the old russian empire, which is mr. putin's lifelong ambition. madam president, i've overstayed my time. i thank my colleague from alabama and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: madam president? the presiding officer: the sen
whether to the level to buy yandex, concerned about the energy situation in germany, yeah, i mean maybe not time to pick things up. i agree with warren buffett. not hard to do, obviously, given his long-term track record. this is where you pick. you're getting a chance. he had a big sell-off friday afternoon and he kind of rallied in the last half hour. if we get those prices again at 330, count me in. count me in. >> fixing my collar here. always important that you look well in the morning when delivering and trying to opine and provide insight. >> the clothes make the man. >> of course on that note, studying up on ukraine and crimea and russia's history with it, and what khrushchev did in '54, whether he gave to them, whether thhe didn't want to dea with it. this forces money manages are to hit the history books. >> my producer, ukraine is -- actually i read the stories, warren's say, remember, 50% of the whole country is russian and the crimea is russian. so, this is kind of a -- apparently there's questions about resources and they use a lot of water in crimea. >> ukraine. >> a lot
, including in energy. and we think it makes a lot of sense to have this pipeline proceed, but not only proceed with can needian oil but balkan oil from canada. the oil is coming down to the united states now, as the state department has properly documented, it's coming down on rail and you and i both know highway 2 in north dakota, 500 tanker trucks a day with oil and we think it makes more sense to be an to pipeline. >> so, tar sands oil, to be very clear is already being refined in the gulf? >> yes, it is. >> okay. and this would just bring more of it to market? >> well, not -- well, yes it would bring more, but it would bring it with a pipeline and the state department, you have people, as you say, on either side of this issue. >> sure h. >> but if we look at the independent dent meritorious review of the state department and the 2,000 pages, they say it's safer, it's less cost and it has less greenhouse gases to have it on a pipeline rather than rail and trucks. and as i say, you and i both know highway 2 in north dakota. >> sure. >> 7500 -- 500 trucks a day you have a democratic s
whoead observes him closely said, it might be energy. energy will be the big area. is for the most part a stable and secure industry. there are dominant players and you can have a monopoly hold on a certain sector of this group. is that similar to what you have heard? areay could be an active for him? >> certainly, he hinted their big energy unit, they did the deal and the battle last year. he said it would not be their last major acquisition. i take him at his word. this industry has room for consolidation. there are utilities out there. i do not know if it will happen this year or when, -- >> let's be clear. i think what you're referring to and powertribution generation, both of which enjoy great labor returns in capital. let's say he could deploy capital at 12% with flow that could cost them nothing over time. it is extraordinary. then there are huge amounts of capital. as to the actual producers of energy, exxon and the rest, i think he struggles with what he thein this as his test, hundred year test. he talked about the new acquisitions still around 100 years. exxon has been around
exports travel through the pipelines that go through ukraine, so how is energy factoring in this equation? >> it's vital. we're being aggressive because we don't depend on russian energy, where as the germans, this is a big debate. maybe this is a positive thing that the russians depend on a trade with europe and why putin's backing off now, or does it make the europeans dependent on russia? >> it's fot really an option for russia to stop the exports. that would be self defeating economically. >> true, but we were talking earlier, on monday the russian stock market lost $70 billion, at the same time, vladimir putin spent $50 billion on the sochi olympics, so i think it's the economic costs making it pause now. >> at some point it's got to have enough of an impact on the russian economy that he's sitting up and taking notice. >> yes, that's why the u.s. is pushing harder for economic sanctions. i think the economic issues make him pause. he's unlikely to push further into ukraine with his troops, but if he feels he's going to lose his warm water port in crimea, which this is all about, he
enough water to take care of their need for the next 25 years. they not only have an energy problem and the pollution problem. they have a problem of fundamental shift in their society from an agrarian society to a society made up of cities of 20 or 30 or arty 5 million people. they are in a position where they have real problems. europe we want to see do well, but why are manufacturers coming from europe as well as china and the far east? gas is seven times cheaper here than it is there. we are going to be the epicenter of energy in north america throughout the first half of the 20th century. that's not a boast. it's a pure, natural fact. we have everything going for us. everything. we have the best education. our workers are three times as productive. that's not the kids they are bad. we are better. it's time we remind ourselves just how powerful we are politically, economically, and
-up. 5.5 million euros per day. russia is a major exporter of energy to europe and a lot of those pipelines go through ukraine. this is a fear premium put into the price of energy and it is affecting our everyday prices. charles: it has applications to the idea this will be east-west, for tat economic sanctions. to a large degree europe needs that oil. sandra: this is also being seen as an opportunity for the united states. the reopen of the discussion of the keystone pipeline, more exports of liquefied natural gas. this could be an opportunity for the united states. charles: oil was already breaking out before this crisis. anything else going on beneath the surface other than the headlines? sandra: it is a safe haven buying. people want to own something other than equities because they see those as the riskiest assets to own right now. charles: a huge move up $31, what is it? gold has one of the roughest years ever last year, now all of a sudden it is seen as a safe haven, why is it a safe haven? sandra: everybody institutionally are piling on. the most bullish they have been on
the effects of reduced energy subsidies from russia. that's why ukrainians have been getting oil and gas and been able to do it cheaply. now that they want to rebuild the economy, they need to work with the imf on this. one of the things the imf is looking for them to do is raise energy prices. a lot is geared toward the energy factor. u.s. is sending technical advisors to work with the government on energy reforms and other types of financial reforms that they need to do to rebuild the economy. they also want to help the ukrainian businesses. they're talking about further assistance. they'll be sending advisors to work on anticorruption and recovering. is it enough? don't know. the ukrainians said they need $30 billion to rebuild the economy. this is a drop in the bucket. >> obviously the administration has been trying to motivate and rally members of the european union to join them in threatening at the at least sanctions and of punishments against the russian government and individuals in the russian government perhaps. i'm wondering what you've heard about the difficulties the u.s. h
link between energy and security. energy and prosperity. and when we don't develop our resources and when we are not able to feed others with our resources and so many others are reliant upon russia who does develop their resources and with that wealth are able to strengthen their military and their influence and power on the globe, then other nations are in trouble. >> well, it is interesting, i thought that k.t. mcfarland had good ideas. also that obama should send a delegation to the czech republic, central europe and help them develop fracking techniques. because then, a big part of the equation is russia is rendered impotent. now vladimir putin has control of that, right? >> right, and see in that building of pipelines is an example of developing natural resources and what they can provide to a region. and here, today, was -- in washingt washington, d.c., we had all of these protesters against the keystone pipeline. look, america needs pipelines just like other parts of the globe we talked about need their pipelines. we need ours. and the protesters grouping about, oh, i don
on its energy are little bit more hesitant, the complete western unity on this issue is unlikely at this point. season companies and individual property and accounts in russia if the sanctions are imposed. concerns or confrontations stretching all the way along the north and east, that is true in the city here, it is a stronghold of pro-russian sentiment in ukraine and it is the home base of ousted president. pro-russian supporters seized a local government building but were remove this morning but not for long. they have retaken the building, re-raising the russian flag and singing soviet era songs. it just highlights the tensions and the divide within ukraine are still running very deep. cheryl: ashley webster, thank you for the update. we will monitor any headlines we will get out of paris but for now of course following this for the client. what are you talking your clients are of interest in eastern europe and in particular with russia, could be be concerned about the stability of the region right now? >> for the last year they have told european clans they face a threat in
have lost but energy resources are extraordinarily rich to use that wealth to reestablish military might. >> the biggest geopolitical threat you said russia. not al qaeda in 1980 soared out they are asking for their foreign policy back because the cold war has been over 20 years. neil: that is the '80s back on the phone because forget whether the president wants to use words like that he might want to do the same. >> if you like your health care plan you can keep it. period. neil: that is the thing is that all comes back to make people think twice. they always regret to their words when it comes to russia at least you are not what we said. >> i remember hillary clinton talked about sniper fire. >> are these recording instruments? >> this rob the faint of a bite to call the '80s and gatt ronald reagan back. but it shows mitt romney but have made a good president who was the biggest -- the best candidate but shown compared to the weak leadership obama me but have been better off. the republican field is so wide open and that the theme is that you just showed better so empirically wro
. they don't have enough water to take care of their need for the next 25 years. they not only have an energy problem and the pollution problem. they have a problem of fundamental shift in their society from an agrarian society to a society made up of cities of 20 or 30 or 35 million people. they are in a position where they have real problems. europe, we want to see do well, but why are manufacturers coming from europe as well as china and the far east? energy, gas is seven times cheaper here than it is there. we are going to be the epicenter of energy in north america throughout the first half of the 20th century. that's not a boast. it's a pure, natural fact. we have everything going for us. everything. we have the best education. our workers are three times as productive. that's not because they are bad. we are better. it's time we remind ourselves just how powerful we are politically, economically, and militarily. use that power to generate the kind of education system, the kind of job opportunities, and the kind of opportunities that grow the rest of the world. there's not a leader in t
bilateral and multilateral interactions. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? the economic situation in russia may be more marvel to economic pressures than most -- may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he is to suffer under, willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. what is the point of all this? putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. many russians believe that crimea is russian territory. the people there identify as russian and crimea should always be a part of russia. there is a nationalistic element , a domestic, political element. has aly, putin long-standing policy of projecting russian power. some will say it is an effort to reconstitute the soviet bloc. i t
significant things in that the military intervention threatens to derail energy under vegan. -- intervention. the key pipelines that go from russia into europe through ukraine. we have seen energy analysts saying that it could affect gas prices as far away as great britain. >> and not to mention supply routes as well for troops in afghanistan. how is it then that vladimir putin feels he has the upper hand, that the international community is impotent? >> i think there is very little militarily that the international community can do. when the kremlin has sent troops across the border in the past of the u.s. and its allies cried foul before. we saw this in 1979, we find thousand eight -- we saw in 2008, but no military action was taken. it is not clear they will go further than seizing crimea, but there is very little beyond diplomatic and economic isolation that the rest of the world can do at this point. it remains to be seen how the ripple effects are going to affect the economy, and also diplomatic ties with russia which we need for other reasons like iran and syria. indira joining us on
at the impact that comes through commodity and energy prices. today, it does not look like this is going to be a deflationary event for the last. that is something we have to be wary of. >> talk about emerging markets and we have elections in india for april and we have a lot of movement in china. without corporate default. are you more cautious than you were? >> i think the answer is that we remain cautious on emerging markets and the growth cycle has not yet got to a pays for a base that benefits the emerging markets and you are seeing the problem come through in china. china knows they cannot rely so heavily on the west for demands and gdp growth on exports. there is also investment spending that has been a big contributor to growth and cannot continue at this sort of pace that it has been. it has to come more from consumer spending and that is hard to generate. there could be a lot of pickups. >> the chief investment officer. we are back into. >> in london, this is on the move in london. we're streaming on your phone and tablet and on bloomberg.com. let's get back to richard. thank y
different ways. obviously rising gas prices along with energy prices on the rise in general. already trading near the highs of the year, partly on concerns about supply disruptions with russia and ukraine. higher grain prices as well or even food prices. ukraine, remember, is a major exporter of wheat and corn. if you pair that with some of the weather issues we have been having, you could see higher sticker prices for your food. then there are american companies with direct exposure to ukraine, like accounting firm pwc. we reached out to them. they came back to us. they actually had to close offices in two different locations. they said although they were briefly closed all of pwc's offices in the ukraine are now open. there are other american companies that we found with business in ukraine. cargill, abbott labs, both no comment. adm, no significant business impact but it's monitoring. baker mckenzie, the first international law firm to open its doors in ukraine in the early '90s, they told me they are keeping an eye on this situation under constant review and employees there are allowed t
that directly benefits from turmoil that could restrict energy exports from russia, driving up the price of crude worldwide. it know it seems a little illogical given that continental's crude goes to gasoline in this country. remember gasoline in this country is priced off the inflated oil price set in europe, not by the domestic price here. and that means bakken oil is even more valuable to east coast refineries than ever because of what was happening with ukrainian/russian tensions. continental got pulled down by the power of the futures. and they're so all encompassing, they crush every stock right or wrong. toe tam opportunity, one that should have been seized, same with the natural gas stocks. our natural gas when it's going to be shipped to europe could help free the west from nat gas tyranny that russia exerts. in other words, it was a positive. how about theme number four. i think the issues over ukraine served to remind us how the asset class of stocks are weak and people not as enriched by a rally. so to use a prime example, we are more, not less likely to shop for discounts. m
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